f

Casting the Distance

Increasing your distance with your cast can be very useful for getting into the right channel or hole where the bigger fish are.  We've designed our rigs to enable you to achieve those extra few metres by making them more streamlined.  Rigs with only a single trace with a strip bait fly much better than double or triple traced rigs with big chunks of bait attached.
Rigs with bait clips on them fly even better with the whole rig set-up being very aerodynamic.  The shape of the sinker also makes a difference.

Use a good quality mainline (no heavier than 18lb) but be sure to use a shockleader, or your line will keep breaking off. (preferably a tapered shockleader so that you end up with a nice small knot where the shockleader joins onto your mainline and will fly through the guides easily) Straight off the ground cast Good casts require a lot of practice.  With this cast start facing in the direction you want to cast to.   Place your sinker directly behind you in a straight line with it resting on the ground.  Your rod tip should be pointing down in the same direction and in-line with the sinker.  Maintain enough pressure on the line to just feel the weight of the sinker.  (Don't forget to open up your bail arm on your reel and make sure drag is up tight).
Start the cast by using your body weight to pull the rod up in a smooth movement (to load up the power in your rod) and turning your body to face the right direction while pulling down your leading arm and finishing with a 'punch' from your trailing arm.
Releasing the line off your finger at the right moment also takes a lot of practice.  A lot of people find it falls of their finger automatically, but try to release it when the rod is at about the 1 o'clock position.  After casting, wind up any slack line, loosen off the drag a bit and place rod in your rod holder.
Have fun!  but watch out for other people around you when casting.  The odd stray cast does happen from time to time.



 

This product has been added to your cart

CHECKOUT